England bound – Sunshine Girls look to bounce back against old foes

first_img The Jamaicans will be joined by captain Malysha Kelly and Vangelee Williams, from Australia and England respectively, where they play club competition. A full-strength Jamaican team is expected for the traditionally fierce match-ups and national coach Minneth Reynolds said she is expecting a much better performance this time around. “We are going out there to compete at our best, and if our best is good enough, then we can be victorious. Our shortcoming was in attack and with the inclusion of Jhaniele Fowler-Reid and Paula Thompson we should be able to compete much better than we did in New Zealand,” she assessed. Other squad members include; Stacian Facey, Adean Thomas, Shamera Sterling, Khadijah Williams, Shantal Slater. Under-21 players Hasana Williams and Carla-lee Tinglin are also included in the squad. “I am hoping to take my time and play the ball, and play my own game and prove myself on the court,” said Williams, 17-year-old from the Queen’s School. Tinglin, an 18-year-old University of the West Indies student is also looking forward to the experience. “I have always had this dream, didn’t know it would come so early though, but the Lord knows best and I will be giving it my all,” Tinglin said. NEW ADDITIONS Netball Jamaica President Dr Paula Daley-Morris is expecting the Sunshine Girls to put recent disappointments behind them and fight to defeat hosts England in their three-match international test series, slated for November 29 to December 4. Ten members of the national team, their management and coaching staff departed Netball House, located in Barbican, yesterday for the Norman Manley International Airport. According to the president, the team is targeting improvements following their recent 3-0 loss to number two ranked New Zealand. The Jamaicans also had a dismal Fast5 World Netball Series showing in Australia, winning two games against lower-ranked teams and losing four. “Well, we are hoping to improve on our performance from the other tours. We definitely need to improve, so that’s the plan,” she outlined. Daley-Morris, describing her team as a mix of youth and experience, feels they will be equipped to take on third-ranked England at home. The Sunshine girls are ranked fourth, behind Australia, New Zealand and England, respectively. “I am confident that it’s going to be fierce in terms of competition,” said the president. “Higher-ranked England? Listen, that is a matter of which year you are talking about, we are equally ranked, no fears, no. I am sure they are more fearful than we are, they have a lot more to lose,” she reasoned. Jamaica will be bolstered by the return of senior ace shooter, Jhaniele Fowler-Reid and Paula Thompson, while goal shooter Shanice Beckford will be hoping to continue her good run from New Zealand.last_img read more

Manchester United not putting in extra work on finishing: Jose Mourinho

first_imgManchester United do not need to practise their finishing to improve their goal-scoring record ahead of Sunday’s Premier League game at Everton, manager Jose Mourinho said.United have won only two of their last 10 league games, severely damaging their title aspirations as they sit sixth in the table, 11 points behind leaders Chelsea after 13 matches. (League Cup: Man United storm into semis, Arsenal ousted by Southampton)”Not the finishing as this is something we always do,” Mourinho told reporters on Friday.United have failed to convert many chances, particularly in home games they have dominated this season, but they did beat West Ham United 4-1 in a League Cup quarter-final on Wednesday.”What we did before West Ham, and to be honest it wasn’t just before the cup, it was before the league game too, was to play against that system with three central defenders and two wing backs,” Mourinho added. (Need more time at Manchester United: Jose Mourinho)”We had to find the right way to explore that system as it was one that – like every system – has good qualities but creates problems.”German midfielder Bastian Schweinsteiger made his first appearance of the season against West Ham and Mourinho said the 32-year-old was the “powerful one” in negotiations with the club because he has a contract until June 2018.”Of course he can. When you have a contract with the club you are the powerful one – you can decide your future,” Mourinho said when asked if Schweinsteiger could stay beyond January. (Zlatan Ibrahimovic confident of winning Premier League with Manchester United)advertisement”In the summer we tried to make something happen for Bastian to get a different future, but he was the powerful one and decided to stay, even in difficult circumstances.”He worked for that and deserved the happiness of the last match. I like people who are determined… He is one who can help us.”After being substituted during the win over West Ham due to injury, left back Luke Shaw is doubtful for the match against Everton, but Mourinho will welcome midfielders Paul Pogba and Marouane Fellaini back from suspension.Captain Wayne Rooney will miss the trip to his former club as he serves a one-match ban.last_img read more

No reported right whale deaths in Canadian waters so far in 2018

first_imgHALIFAX – There have been no reported deaths of North Atlantic right whales in Canadian waters this year — with dozens of the endangered mammals spotted amid strict fishing and vessel speed restrictions, federal officials say.There were 12 whale deaths last year in Canadian waters, half of those in June.“Earlier in the year there was a report in the United States of one (death) … but in Canadian waters there have been none,” said Adam Burns, director general of fisheries resource management at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO).At least 18 right whales have been found dead overall in Canadian and U.S. waters since 2017, likely due to rope entanglements and ship collisions.DFO said Thursday that aerial surveillance had so far detected at least 75 whales in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.“This number likely underestimates the total number of right whales that may be present in the southern Gulf or in Canadian waters at this time,” said Jean Landry, the department’s director of marine mammal science.Landry said observers had logged 371 flying hours since early April, more than last year’s total by science aircraft.Meanwhile, DFO has temporarily closed 4,600 square kilometres of the Gulf and another 780 square kilometres in the Roseway Basin off Nova Scotia’s southern coast to non-tended fixed gear fisheries such as snow crab and lobster.The closures have drawn the ire of some lobster fishermen, who say the latest closures have squeezed them into tight proximity in zones that are already heavily fished.Nearly 500 brought empty lobster traps to Caraquet, N.B., on Thursday to protest against the continuing closures. They created a wall of traps outside a building where Acadie-Bathurst Liberal MP Serge Cormier has an office.But with the lobster and snow crab seasons set to wrap up at the end of this month, Burns said DFO isn’t about to relent on urgent measures, given the unprecedented number of right whale deaths last year.“These measures have a real impact on fish harvesters, processors, and communities in Atlantic Canada; however the long-term economic risks of not adequately protecting North Atlantic right whales is greater,” Burns said.He said there has already been a temporary suspension of Marine Stewardship Council certification for the snow crab fishery in the southern Gulf, and additional trade and eco-certification impacts could result in “long term serious economic impacts to coastal communities in Atlantic Canada and Quebec.”Still the industry continues to speak out with an eye to the future after reports of lobster landings that are down by as much as 25 per cent in some areas.Groups such as the Maritime Fishermen’s Union and the Pecheurs professionnels du Sud de la Gaspesie have said frustration is mounting after Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc decided not to exempt waters up to 10 fathoms deep from the closures.LeBlanc has said he isn’t insensitive to fishermen’s concerns and Ottawa is considering ways to alleviate the economic hardship. That includes measures to help processing plant workers qualify for Employment Insurance, and a possible fall opening of the lobster fishery to make up for lost days.The Lobster Council of Canada called for measures that balance protection with the impact on fishermen.“While we all agree we must do what we can to ensure the protection of the North Atlantic right whale, we believe we must continue to monitor the impact many of these mitigation measures are having on the people and communities that rely on the lobster fishery for their livelihood,” council executive director Geoff Irvine said in a news release Wednesday.“We need to continue to look for the right balance to allow the fishery to continue while ensuring the right whale’s protection.”Meanwhile, Transport Canada provided statistics on its mandatory slow-down area in the western Gulf, where vessels of 20 metres or larger are limited to a speed of 10 knots.Luc Brisebois, executive director of marine safety and security, said 1,085 vessels have been monitored to date. Of that number, 106 were recorded above the speed limit.“Out of those 106, there were 84 deemed non-violation,” Brisebois said, for issues related to time at speed, and the effects of weather or sea conditions.He said 21 cases are still under review, but since the slowdown was implemented April 28 only one vessel has been found in violation, resulting in a $6,000 fine.last_img read more